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How Do You Build a Golden Bridge?

The phrase “Golden Bridge” comes from a Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu, who twenty-five hundred years ago wrote a book called The Art of War. He talked about building your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across. In negotiation I would reframe that positively as a golden bridge for both of you to advance across. Frustrated by the other side’s resistance, you may be tempted to push—to cajole, to insist, and to apply pressure. But pushing may actually make it more difficult for the other side to agree. It underscores the fact that the proposal is your ...

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Radio Boston

Co-Founder Of Harvard Negotiation Program: ‘Get To Yes With Yourself’ Negotiation is likely a part of your daily life. Whether it’s with your spouse or your children, your boss or your colleagues — we all deal with conflict. So, what could get you to win-win solutions? According to William Ury, co-author of the bestselling book, “Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In,” the key is understanding ourselves. “Getting to Yes” — which was published over 30 years ago — is required reading at most business schools. But now, Ury is out ...

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Santos iniciará 2015 con un ‘retiro espiritual’

Jonathan Powell, Joaquín Villalobos, Shlomo Ben Ami y William Ury estarán junto al presidente en la casa presidencial de Cartagena. El 2015 el presidente Juan Manuel Santos decidió iniciarlo junto a cuatro asesores de paz en la casa presidencial de Cartagena, donde verificarán el avance de los acuerdos y analizarán lo que viene en el siguiente punto en la agenda de negociaciones. En dicho encuentro, tanto el mandatario como los asesores deberán analizar los pasos a seguir con las negociaciones, ya que este es el proceso de paz más sensible, pues trata de ...

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Global Oneness Day

A New Leadership Model for the 21st Century October, 2014 Listen here >>  

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Getting Past No – Use Power to Educate

Excerpt from Getting Past No: Negotiating in Difficult Situations by William Ury The key mistake we make when we feel frustrated is to abandon the problem-solving game and turn to the power game instead. Overcoming the power paradox means making it easier for the other side to say yes at the same time that you make it harder for them to say no. Making it easy to say yes requires problem-solving negotiation; making it hard to say no requires exercising power. You don’t need to choose between the two. You can do both. Treat the exercise of power as an integral part ...

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Golden Bridge

How Do You Build a Golden Bridge? The phrase “Golden Bridge” comes from Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu, who twenty five hundred years ago wrote a book called The Art of War. He talked about building your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across. In negotiation I would reframe that positively as a golden bridge for both of you to advance across. In other words, what often happens in difficult conflicts is that when we’ve got an idea, we tend to push the other side. We tend to try and put pressure on them. Of course the more pressure you put on someone, ...

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Getting Past No – From Adversaries to Partners

Excerpt from Getting Past No: Negotiating in Difficult Situations by William Ury  It takes two to tangle, but it takes only one to begin to untangle a knotty situation. It is within your power to transform even your most difficult relationships. Your greatest power is the power to change the game—from face-to-face confrontation to side-by-side joint problem-solving. Obstructing the path are formidable barriers: your natural reactions, their hostile emotions, their positional behavior, their strong dissatisfaction, and their perceived power. You can overcome these ...

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Getting Past No – The Five Steps of Breakthrough Negotiation

Excerpt from Getting Past No: Negotiating in Difficult Situations by William Ury Whether you are negotiating with your boss, a hostage-taker, or your teenager, the basic principles remain the same. In summary, the five steps of breakthrough negotiation are: 1. Go to the Balcony. The first step is not to control the other person’s behavior. It is to control your own. When the other person says no or launches an attack, you may be stunned into giving in or counterattacking. So suspend your reaction by naming the game. Then buy yourself time to think. Use the time to ...

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